Kraft vs. Starbucks: The Beginning To The End (2)

Two months after Kraft denied Starbucks’ offer, Starbucks accused Kraft of materially breaching the contract and informed Kraft that it would be terminating the contract effective March 1, 2011, unless Kraft “cured the alleged breaches within 30 days,” resulting in Kraft’s filing a complaint and motion for preliminary injunction. (Complaint, ¶ 58). In its complaint, Kraft alleged that Starbucks made misleading statements to the press, its investors and Kraft’s customers by “falsely maligning Kraft’s performance” in order to avoid the amount of money that Starbucks would be obligated to pay Kraft for its material breach of the business contract. (Complaint, ¶ 1).

Kraft argued that Starbucks’ breach allegations lacked merit because Kraft’s overall performance under the contract and its “effective in promoting Starbucks Products ha[d] been outstanding by any reasonable measure,” and that Starbucks’ attempt to terminate the contract without complying with its disputed resolution provisions was improper. (Complaint, ¶ 61, 67). Further, Kraft argued that Starbucks’ issuance of a press release impugning Kraft’s performance was misleading and caused an interference with Kraft’s customer relationships. (Complaint, ¶ 76).

Kraft’s argument that it would suffer irreparable harm if injunction was not granted was as follows: 1) Kraft would lose its right to arbitration, 2) Starbucks would continue to publicize the purported termination of its contract with Kraft thereby confusing the market, and 3) Kraft would have no adequate remedy at law, and “money simply [would] not be able to compensate Kraft for the damage that will ensue to its business and reputation.” (Complaint, ¶ 131).

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