A Blip in the Transmission: Part 2

The second factor, whether there is a serious threat of irreparable harm, was, comparatively speaking, much more easily considered. While there is no assumption of harm for copyright claims in the 10th Circuit, the nature of a copyright claim does tend to make it easier for plaintiffs to prove this factor. Aereo argued that any financial damage they might have done to the plaintiffs were essentially insignificant, but the court found that appeal wanting, noting that one of the purposes of copyright is ensuring the exclusive control of the copyright material, so that the owner can ensure that the content’s value is not tainted or diluted by unauthorized use, such as the creation of inferior quality copies, or interference in potential business relationships based on the content. As a result, the court felt that this factor also weighed in favor of granting the injunction.

The third and fourth factors only merited truncated discussion. The court first examined the balance of harms and, although noting that Aereo did face a loss of business should the injunction be entered, in all likelihood, their entire business model was based on copyright infringement.  The loss of such a business was not grounds to prevent a preliminary injunction from being entered. The court then examined the public interest, noting that the public’s interest was in seeing the law of copyrights upheld. Our next post will deal with the scope of injunction, the bond, and Aereo’s attempt to transfer venue.