Kraft vs. Starbucks: The Beginning To The End (3)

In response, Starbucks argued that an injunction was unnecessary because Kraft failed to show that it would suffer irreparable harm in the absence of injunctive relief. Starbucks stated that it had the undisputed right to terminate the contract at any time because Kraft had materially breached the terms by failing to perform its obligations under the contract by “withholding sales presentations and other materials” and failing to improve Starbucks’ declining sales, thereby releasing Starbucks of its obligations under the contract. (Response, pp 6). Further, pursuant to the termination provision of the underlying contract, the damages that Kraft would suffer would be compensable by money damages based on Kraft’s alleged harm of losing the exclusive right to distribute a product through Starbucks. Kraft is the largest food company in North America, and revenues from Starbucks account for 1% of Kraft’s annual revenue. (Response, pp 16).

Is this numerical value significant enough to demonstrate irreparable harm to Kraft? Starbucks said no and cited the following cases. In Litho Prestige, Div. of Unimedia Group, Inc. v. News Am. Publ’g, Inc., 652 F. Supp. 804, 808 (S.D.N.Y. 1986), the court stated that an argument that a four percent business loss would cripple the plaintiff was “wholly unpersuasive”. In Reiter’s Beer Distribs., Inc. v. Christian Schmidt Brewing Co., No. 86 CS 534, 1986 WL 13950, at *11 (E.D.N.Y. Sept. 9, 1986), the court found no irreparable harm where sales of beers at issue constituted between 17% and 29% of distributor’s total sales. Based on these holdings, the potential 1% loss of Kraft’s annual revenue is far from demonstrating irreparable harm. 

Kraft vs. Starbucks: The Beginning To The End (2)

Two months after Kraft denied Starbucks’ offer, Starbucks accused Kraft of materially breaching the contract and informed Kraft that it would be terminating the contract effective March 1, 2011, unless Kraft “cured the alleged breaches within 30 days,” resulting in Kraft’s filing a complaint and motion for preliminary injunction. (Complaint, ¶ 58). In its complaint, Kraft alleged that Starbucks made misleading statements to the press, its investors and Kraft’s customers by “falsely maligning Kraft’s performance” in order to avoid the amount of money that Starbucks would be obligated to pay Kraft for its material breach of the business contract. (Complaint, ¶ 1).

Kraft argued that Starbucks’ breach allegations lacked merit because Kraft’s overall performance under the contract and its “effective in promoting Starbucks Products ha[d] been outstanding by any reasonable measure,” and that Starbucks’ attempt to terminate the contract without complying with its disputed resolution provisions was improper. (Complaint, ¶ 61, 67). Further, Kraft argued that Starbucks’ issuance of a press release impugning Kraft’s performance was misleading and caused an interference with Kraft’s customer relationships. (Complaint, ¶ 76).

Kraft’s argument that it would suffer irreparable harm if injunction was not granted was as follows: 1) Kraft would lose its right to arbitration, 2) Starbucks would continue to publicize the purported termination of its contract with Kraft thereby confusing the market, and 3) Kraft would have no adequate remedy at law, and “money simply [would] not be able to compensate Kraft for the damage that will ensue to its business and reputation.” (Complaint, ¶ 131).

Kraft vs. Starbucks: The Beginning To The End

Kraft Foods filed a complaint and motion for preliminary injunction relief against Starbucks in attempt to protect its twelve-year relationship with the Coffee Company and to provisionally restrain Starbucks from acting on its purported termination of the contract with Kraft. Kraft Foods Global, Inc. v. Starbucks Corporation, Case Number 7:10-cv-09085 S.D.N.Y.).

Under the contract, Starbucks manufactured and supplied the Starbucks branded products to Kraft, and Kraft owned the exclusive right to sell, market and distribute certain packaged Starbucks roasted whole bean and ground coffee to Kraft’s customer base of grocery stores and other retail food outlets. This contract between the parties had an initial term that would expire in 2014 and an automatic renewal for successive ten-year terms.

In 2010, Starbucks decided that it wanted to take over Kraft’s portion of the business and sought to terminate its contract with Kraft. Pursuant to the contract, Starbucks had the express right to terminate its relationship with Kraft as long as it 1) provided 180 days’ advance notice, and 2) compensated Kraft for the loss of its rights under the contract in an amount tied to fair market value of the business. Starbucks gave notice to Kraft and offered $750 million in exchange for a consensual termination of the contract to which Kraft declined alleging that $750 was not the fair market value of its business. (Agreement, ¶ 5).