Prefacing Note on Intellectual Property Tests and Standards (Part 1 of 4)

                Before we further analyze Apple’s motion and the Court’s denial of it, we must first examine some of the tests and standards used in intellectual property law.  These tests and standards are key to understanding the reasonable likelihood of success prong.  For the reasonable likelihood of success on merits prong, Apple must demonstrate that it would be likely to prove infringement at trial and that Samsung would not be likely to prove invalidity at trial.

                With respect to three design patents (D’677, D’087, D’899), the test for infringement asks: “would an ordinary observer perceive the design of the accuse device to be ‘substantially the same’ as the design of the patent?”  This ‘substantially the same’ (or substantial similarities) standard is met when “‘the resemblance [between the accused device’s design and design patent] is such to deceive such an observer, inducing him to purchase one supposing it to be the other.’”  Court Order Denying Motion for Preliminary Injunction at 24. With respect to software patent ‘381, Apple must prove likely infringement of at least one the claims of the ‘381 patent.  A patent claim is infringed if the accused device reads on every element of the claim.